What To Do in a Pet Emergency: Top Key Steps

png
Do in a Pet Emergency

Our pets are not just animals; they’re cherished members of our families, bringing boundless joy and unconditional love into our lives. However, as responsible pet owners, we must acknowledge the reality that emergencies can arise unexpectedly. Being equipped with the knowledge and confidence to handle these situations is paramount for ensuring the well-being of our furry companions. In this in-depth guide, we will meticulously explore the critical steps to take during a pet emergency, using plain language and a tone that resonates with any caring pet owner.

Pet Emergency

What is the pet emergency?

When your pet is unwell or injured, they can’t express what’s wrong, how much discomfort they’re in, or the internal issues they might be facing. As pet parents, it’s crucial to pay close attention to any shifts in your pet’s behavior and seek veterinary assistance if you have any uncertainties. Taking a proactive approach enables you and your veterinary team to collaborate effectively, catching potential problems early on. This ensures the well-being of your furry friend.

Pets, especially cats, often have a natural instinct to hide or conceal signs of illness. It’s crucial to observe any alterations in their behavior as these could be indicators of sickness. If your pet doesn’t return to their usual self promptly, it’s essential to consider consulting a veterinarian.

Certain symptoms, like bleeding, seizures, collapse, or changes in breathing, are more apparent signs that demand immediate attention and care. In such cases, seeking prompt veterinary assistance is crucial for your pet’s well-being.

What To Do in a Pet Emergency?

If you find yourself in a pet emergency, follow these simple steps:

Stay Calm:
Keeping a calm demeanor is crucial. Your pet can sense your emotions, and it helps create a less stressful environment for them.

Contact Your Vet or Emergency Facility:
Reach out to your family veterinarian or the nearest after-hours emergency facility. Time is of the essence, and professional guidance is essential.

Handle Your Pet with Care:
Recognize that your pet may be scared and in pain. Move them cautiously to avoid any potential biting. For cats, use a carrier for safe transport, and for dogs, secure them with a leash and a snug-fitting collar or harness.

Information Gathering:
If your pet has ingested something toxic, collect as much information as possible about the substance, the quantity ingested, and the time of ingestion. If feasible, bring the packaging or take a photo of it for reference.

Avoid Inducing Vomiting Without Guidance:
Refrain from inducing vomiting unless specifically instructed to do so by your veterinarian. Inappropriate actions can exacerbate certain situations.

Provide Medication Information:
Bring along a list or a photo of any medications your pet regularly takes. This information aids the veterinarian in understanding your pet’s medical history.

Signs Your Dog May Need Emergency Vet Care

Here are signs that indicate it’s time to take your dog to an emergency vet in Toronto:

Trauma:
If your dog experiences an attack by another animal or gets involved in an accident with a moving vehicle.

Toxic Ingestion:
In case of eating something toxic or harmful.

Breathing Changes:
A noticeable increase in breathing rate or difficulty in breathing.

Digestive Issues in Puppies:
Any vomiting or diarrhea in a puppy.

Persistent Vomiting or Diarrhea in Adults:
If your adult dog is vomiting repeatedly or experiencing multiple episodes of diarrhea.

Unproductive Retching:
Repeated retching without producing any vomit.

Urinary Issues:
Blood in urine or difficulty in producing urine.

Eye Problems:
Red, painful, or swollen eyes.

Abdominal Swelling:
A swollen or distended abdomen, which could be a life-threatening emergency known as GDV in dogs.

Bites from Wildlife:
Bites from snakes, wasps, or bees.

Refusal to Eat:
If your dog refuses to eat for more than 24 hours.

Uncontrolled Bleeding:
Any sign of uncontrollable bleeding.

Pale Gums:
Gums appearing pale.

Weakness:
General weakness in your dog.

Extreme Pain:
If your pet seems to be in too much pain to move or rest comfortably.

Seizures:
Episodes of seizures.

Collapse or Loss of Consciousness:
If your dog collapses or loses consciousness.

Signs Your Cat Might Need Emergency Vet Care

Here are signs that indicate it’s time to take your cat to an emergency vet:

Trauma:

If your cat experiences an attack by another animal or gets involved in an accident with a moving vehicle.

Toxic Exposure:

In case of eating something toxic or coming into contact with a harmful substance.

Breathing Changes:

A noticeable increase in breathing rate or difficulty in breathing.

Sudden Coughing:

If your cat starts coughing suddenly.

Eye Problems:

Red, painful, or swollen eyes.

Digestive Issues in Kittens:

Any vomiting or diarrhea in a kitten.

Persistent Digestive Issues in Adults:

If your adult cat is vomiting repeatedly or experiencing multiple episodes of diarrhea.

Urinary Problems:

Blood in urine or difficulty in producing urine.

Uncontrolled Bleeding:

Any sign of uncontrollable bleeding.

Pale Gums:

Gums appearing pale.

Weakness:

General weakness in your cat.

Extreme Pain:

If your cat seems to be in too much pain to move or rest comfortably.

Seizures:

Episodes of seizures.

Collapse or Loss of Consciousness:

If your cat collapses or loses consciousness.

 

Finding Emergency Veterinary Care Near you

Dealing with a pet emergency can be overwhelming, but having a plan in place can help ease the stress. One proactive step is knowing where emergency veterinary care is located in your area. Establishing a relationship with a veterinarian who provides regular preventive care for your pet is essential. Many of them are equipped to handle emergencies during their business hours.

Ask your family veterinarian in advance about the options available when they are not accessible, especially during evenings, weekends, or holidays. Store this information in your phone and display it prominently on your refrigerator. Ensure that family members or pet sitters who assist in caring for your pet are also aware of this crucial information.

Additionally, keep the Pet Poison Helpline number handy (647) 347-3300) in your cellphone contacts. This way, you can quickly seek advice in case of potential toxin exposure.

For those who travel with their pets, plan ahead to identify emergency veterinary care options at your destination. In rural or remote areas, be mindful that finding a veterinary hospital open after hours may require a more extended drive. Preparedness is key, ensuring your beloved pet gets the timely care they need, even in unforeseen circumstances.

Call Us Now